Royal Adelaide Hospital Competition

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Reuse, diversification, decentralization and even organized chaos all form the foundation of this design attempt. The site is influenced in even proportions by its three neighbors and although the periphery is allowed to leak in to some extent, the core is preserved for new and unique use.

The Botanic Garden penetrates the site from the Northeast only to meet a newly formed artistic arena, studios and a Graffiti Gallery, that may also be used as a Pacour training site all developed within the special frame of the North wing. Together with the native history-meeting place and new Medical Museum, these answer to the level and density of activities targeted by the Cultural Pracinct. The proximity of the Parklands gives birth to an Urban food garden and Research Centre that makes use of the East Wing. They connect to a bio-market place opening in plaza in the place of an old parking space. The Market faces North Terrace together with a series of retail and hospitality spaces occupying the ground floors of the preserved and renovated Brice, McEwin and Allied Health Building. These three are in direct contact with the East End and logically contain all four basic functions of the City: retail, office, hospitality and a small portion of residences on the roof floor. The functions penetrate the inside, where a second row of structures, the former Outpatient Block, Theater Block and Emergency Wing, enhance this spatial program.

The needs of the fast developing Educational Precinct to the west cannot be easily neglected, so extension of existing and development of new educational and research spaces is natural. Different research related institutions already use the buildings along Frome Road that are renovated and extended to the east as far as Robert Gerard Wing. It accommodates a newly formed Sustainability Research and Educational Centre with public exhibition spaces and Auditoriums.

Hospitals are robust and their structural life is worth prolonging. The historical buildings from the periphery form a semi-permeable frame to the south-west border that serves as an extention of the beautiful North Terrace promenade but also invites visitors in. To serve this purpose they need a clean from the extra “flesh“ accumulated thought the years that damages their true beauty and prevents the formation of new connections to the core. This process goes deeper eating its way, forming a clear yet complex passageway network. To develop this new space a series of new interactions between the valuable external shell and the inside take place, that make a volumetric imprint on the volumes leaving them scared with history but still fit for new function.

The proximity of the Cultural precinct urges for a culturally enhanced experiences and the answer of this uniquely situated site is unexpected. The New Medical Museum is a rigid structure defining the edge, but to urge connectivity its rear side is opened to the inner streets offering an enclosed square under an atrium. The Sustainability Centre offers an interesting travel combined with a learning opportunity. The newly formed walls of centre mixed-use buildings are designed as climbing walls. The artistic hub urges unofficial art forms through an open scene with tribunes, semi demolished graffiti gallery, parcour training site and a skaters ramp.

Reuse in itself promotes sustainability. Combining it with Green roofs and gardening, renewable energy, just enhances the results. High density construction helps overheating problems with more shadow. The Botanic gardens already has an educational program about urban gardening and it needs to be developed. The Gerdens apart from being a research site for modern urban agriculture should also educate and promote. It is fully self-sustaining using solar power, water catchment, composting etc. and sells cheap food to the local restaurants, the Market and the Zoo. Its connection to the Sustainability Centre gives unique opportunities. The Business will follow.

 

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